Engaging students through collaborative music creation expert visit

Dr. Peter Wiegold, from the Brunel University of London, UK, accepted our invitation to be the expert visitor. Dr. Wiegold is a renowned conductor of 20th and 21st century and traditional repertoire, as well as for his improvisation and collaborative work with orchestras and ensembles.

Project Category:
Visits by world-leading researchers
Topic Area:
Arts
Ministry Priority
(2011-2013):
Engagement
Project Lead(s):
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Lead Institution:
Brief Background:
Dr. Peter Wiegold, from the Brunel University of London, UK, accepted our invitation to be the expert visitor. Dr. Wiegold is a renowned conductor of 20th and 21st century and traditional repertoire, as well as for his improvisation and collaborative work with orchestras and ensembles. Dr. Wiegold has long been an innovator on the British music scene with a history of looking radically at all aspects of the process of music making. In particular, he has been a pioneer of, and leading exponent of, bringing together composition and improvisation, and he often works directly with musicians in the creation of new work and as ‘creative director’. Notably, he led the long term ‘Creative Exchange’ program with the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, training musicians in improvisation and realization skills and performing in several different venues. Dr. Wiegold is one of Britain’s leading trainers in workshop technique, creative leadership and improvisation. His expertise directly aligns with the goals of this project – provide expert knowledge in a specific and specialized field and create inspiration and innovation of new ideas to engage students through collaborative music creation. As mentioned above this proposal to support an Expert Visit is two-fold: First it is planned in conjunction with the follow-up KNAER-RECRAE project, Engaging Students through Collaborative Music Creation. The second goal is to initiate and generate research knowledge mobilization to art practitioners in Ontario and to the related academic community through a series of presentations and discussions with teachers in the Toronto and Waterloo areas.
Research Context:
The knowledge to be mobilized in this project is to provide teachers and faculty effective strategies to effectively engage students through the composing, improvising, and recording of music. Patricia O’Toole (2000) and Lucy Green (2002) focused on the disparity between how we teach in the schools and how popular musicians learn. Green (2008) further demonstrated the benefits of teaching in the schools in the way popular musicians in the community learn and work. Willingham et al. (2007) pointed to the “community contributors” to the education of a musical society as a means of reorienting school music. Commonly, the creative activity of musicians in the community now involves composing, improvising, and recording. However, Bartel and Cameron (2002) found that music teachers had the least confidence to teach composing and improvising. With the latest Ontario Ministry of Education Arts Curriculum (2010) calling for a strong role for creative music making including composing and improvising, teachers need to understand the latest research and have practical examples in context from an expert.
Knowledge Mobilization Activities:
Knowledge mobilization is inherent to this project. Dr. Peter Wielbold will present public lectures in Toronto and Waterloo as part of the broader proposal. Presentations and informal interchanges with teacher groups, music faculty and graduate students in the Waterloo area and the Toronto area will also take place. All workshops and final reporting conferences organized and funded for this project will be open to the wider educational community. Individual project results will be made available as appropriate through web casts, YouTube-type videos, or web-posted resources . The websites of CMERC and LcMc will be used as vehicles.
Outcomes:
One of the noted effects of the Ontario English Catholic Teachers’ Association Community Learning Centres project was the sense of empowerment and confidence gained by the participants. This is anticipated and should result in presentation of new knowledge and practice at the board and Provincial Music Association level.