Topic: Equity & Diversity, Well-Being
Grade: K-3, 4-6, 7-9
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
A key message to convey to students is that being a good role model is about following your dreams and being a positive influence to others as well. Our society seems to favour people of a certain appearance. We need to accept others for who they are, and understand that role models are persons who present positive characteristics such as kindness. Even young children can begin to form negative views associated with appearance. As children mature, they are exposed to media role models who are famous. This lesson helps children and adolescents discuss the characteristics of role models.
Link to Resource:
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
This lesson plan introduces the concepts of functional and appropriate clothing: clothing is something we use to enjoy the various types of weather and weather-related activities. Clothing is not something to compare each other by as students are sensitive to social comparison. Students may need support in making clothing choices based on weather, availability of clothing, and preference, but sometimes there is peer pressure and media pressure to conform or to look a certain way.
Link to Resource:
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
This lesson plan introduces students to the intentions of advertising and marketing. Girls as young as 5 to 6 years old state that their ideal size is smaller than their real size. Media exposure can affect children’s body image and could lead to disordered eating. Overweight children are just as likely to internalize and endorse stigmas pertaining to overweight and obese individuals. This is related to the media perpetuated belief that people have full control over how much they weigh and how they look and that if they purchase certain diet foods or join certain clubs, they will weigh less and be happier. Students need to understand that advertising is used to make you want something you don’t necessarily need.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Chart, Lesson Plan, Website
Description:
Children can confuse being “healthy” with being thin. Teachers and parents can help by defining health with them. Students need to see that there are many facets to health such as: feeling happy, being rested, and listening to self-regulating prompts such as hunger, thirst, satiety and so on. Children at this age can see people on diets and confuse this with “being healthy.” At this stage, children are beginning to endorse stigma around size and shape, perhaps believing that persons of thin sizes are healthy or somehow better than persons of larger sizes.
Link to Resource:
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Activity, Chart, Lesson Plan, Website
Description:
This lesson plan introduces students to normal and healthy differences between people. Family modelling of diet and exercise can influence children's notions that being fat is bad and that it is okay to be dissatisfied with your body. Children begin to associate being overweight with negative connotations. Self esteem is significantly based on the opinions of others as weight and appearance can dictate who children want to have as friends. Learning that everyone is different and it is okay to be different needs to be a primary focus.
Link to Resource:
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Activity, Chart, Lesson Plan, Website
Description:
This lesson plan introduces students to body image and learning that it is okay to be different. Body image relates to how we see ourselves: our size, shape, colour (anything that contributes to what our body looks like). This can be anything from our freckles to our feet. It also includes how we “dress up” and try to change our bodies. This lesson will teach students that all bodies are different and that our bodies allow us to do many different things. Children at this age can begin to form negative attitudes around “difference” so it is important for them to learn to appreciate that everyone’s body is different and that is positive.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Language Arts
Grade: 7-9
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
This is a lesson plan where students will begin to analyze messages in advertisements and present their findings to the class. Students will discover that advertising is a construction that preys on our insecurities, presents false hope, and reinforces stereotypes to try and convince us we need to buy something. Adolescents are increasingly self-conscious about their physical appearance; parents and teachers can play a protective role in helping them to accept their changing bodies.
Language:
English
Topic: Language Arts
Grade: 4-6
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
This is a lesson plan designed to teach the students that advertisements sell more than just a product. There are often hidden messages in them and the students need to always be aware of what they are. Children and pre-adolescents can be very sensitive to the opinions of others, which makes them also vulnerable to advertising messages.This lesson addresses the advertising tactic of making assumptions about who will be watching the ads, and how ads try to create a need for people to purchase the products.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Language Arts
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
This is a lesson plan designed to teach students to be a little more critical when watching television. The lesson will reinforce that things are not always as they seem on television because the media portray them one way, when in real life they are completely different. Advertising strategies should be discussed in order to increase the students’ awareness of the power of media images. Students need to come away with the knowledge that media (and what they see on television) are not always “real” and they need to think about the images they see and question when media doesn’t make sense. Children at this age have vivid imaginations and they are also easily swayed. At times they may not be sure of what is real or not (whether or not animals can talk).
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Activity, Lesson Plan, Teaching Tips
Description:
At an early age, children begin to form negative attitudes toward those who are different. They also begin to associate being overweight with negative characteristics or habits. As soon as children begin to form their perceptions, they need to learn the difference between tattling and reporting. Adults need to support the ideas that: words hurt; teasing is not okay; and no one deserves to be bullied. (For additional reference, please review the attached list of “Common Misconceptions About Bullying”). When adults don’t intervene and help children/students solve issues, they are modeling that being a silent bystander is acceptable.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Chart
Description:
This developmental chart is an accompanying resource to the lesson plans on body image and outlines research on how students feel about body image and ways that you can talk to them about it.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Website
Description:
This website provides educators with research based resources and lesson plans designed to support students in developing positive body images.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan
Description:
Family modeling of diet and exercise can influence girls’ notions of anti-fat and body dissatisfaction. Overweight children are just as likely to internalize and endorse stigmas pertaining to overweight and obese individuals. This may be due to the media and the belief that weight is solely an issue of individual responsibility (i.e., “they should eat less”). Children can learn that there are many ways to enjoy movement, not only through participating on sports teams.
Link to Resource:
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Lesson Plan, Website
Description:
This lesson is designed to teach students to be a little more critical when watching television. The lesson will reinforce that things are not always as they seem on television because the media portray them one way, when in real life they are completely different. Advertising strategies should be discussed in order to increase the students’ awareness of the power of media images. Students need to come away with the knowledge that media (and what they see on television) are not always “real” and they need to think about the images they see and question when media doesn’t make sense. Children at this age have vivid imaginations and they are also easily swayed. At times they may not be sure of what is real or not (whether or not animals can talk).
PDF(s) of Resource:
Link to Resource:
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English
Topic: Well-Being
Grade: K-3
Type of Resource: Chart, Lesson Plan, Website
Description:
Children at young ages notice if adults model being on a diet or talking about it. Teachers and parents should be as confident and comfortable with their own body image as possible to model acceptance and love for oneself. It is important to emphasize the nutritional value of food and support the idea of food as being part of a social and pleasurable need. It is also important not to over monitor or regulate a child’s eating, but to encourage them to self-regulate and attend to cues such as hunger, thirst and satiety.
Project Lead:
Lorayne Robertson
Language:
English